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> What do you know about the Veteran's Administration Headstone Program?
Shanifaye
post Feb 24 2008, 11:17 AM
Post #1


Administrator
***

Group: Root Admin
From: Lilburn, GA
Surnames:
Inman, Bradley, Byers, Derreberry, Owensby and all various spellings thereof





I am sure some of us know about this, but I wanted to make sure everyone did.

QUOTE
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) furnishes upon request, at no charge to the applicant, a government headstone or marker for the grave of any deceased eligible veteran in any cemetery around the world. For all deaths occurring before September 11, 2001, the VA may provide a headstone or marker only for graves that are not marked with a private headstone.
Spouses and dependents buried in a private cemetery are not eligible for a government-provided headstone or marker.
Flat markers in granite, marble, and bronze and upright headstones in granite and marble are available. The style chosen must be consistent with existing monuments at the place of burial. Niche markers are also available to mark columbaria used for inurnment of cremated remains.

Right now I am heading up a project for my husband’s family for one of his ancestors that fought in the War Between the States. At the time of his death in 1923, the family could not afford a traditional tombstone, which meant his is one of many graves marked by nothing but a fieldstone. Unfortunately the church cemetery he was buried at kept no records at all of the burials done in their cemetery, not even a note as to what section a person was laid to rest.
It has been 85 years since his death, and there is no longer anyone living who might remember which rock is his. We have no known place to put flowers or anything to honor him except that his death certificate states he was interred in a specific cemetery.
I am lucky enough that the pastor and the church board agree with me that its important for there to be a marker for this Confederate Veteran and they are currently voting on letting me place a stone in the cemetery, and while it might not be on his actual grave, its at least “something” and will act as a lasting remembrance to a man that endured four years of hell and survived to raise a very long lived and prolific family, one that I am extremely proud to have married into.

Once I have the official “ok” the Pastor and I will pick an appropriate place to have the stone set. I was nervous as to how much setting the stone would cost because, fortunately, I have never had to handle this kind of situation. I called a monument company that is local to the cemetery and was very surprised to find out that they would only charge 125 dollars to set the stone. They even offered to help me fill out the VA application and to take delivery of it, which was something that was worrying me as I didn’t know how I was going to lug around a 230 pound tombstone.

You may ask why am I telling you this story? I do it for one simple reason…how many of us know where a veteran is buried but was not so fortunate as to have a marker? How many of us are lucky enough to have such brave men as ancestors, but there is nothing to mark their service? Growing up in the south I was raised to honor the dead, I still feel guilty when I am in a cemetery and have to actually step on a grave to walk around in it. No matter what war a person served in, no matter what your view on that particular war may have been, I believe that solider deserves to be honored for the sacrifice he gave his country, whether he died in that war, or managed to survive to live out his life. There are so many soldiers that ended up in mass graves, there eventual resting place unknown, that even knowing what section of earth he lays can be a comfort.

I am very lucky that my ancestor is not in a city cemetery and that this church has the discretion of even thinking about letting me do this and I wanted to pass it along to you so that if you could be so lucky as well, you will know that, no matter the war, the government feels that the need for these soldiers to be honored is so strong, they provide you a way to do it for free…they do not even charge you for the delivery fee of the stone.

In my own situation, I am planning a memorial service for William Redding Byers once the stone is up and many of the family members are really excited about it, they are even offering to chip in for the cost of the stone setting. Once we have gone thru the entire process I will report back as to if there were any complications that we encountered, but the lady at the monument company told me she fills these out all the time and has never encountered difficulty as long as all documents the VA wants are submitted with the request.

It is my sincere hope that this information is helpful to someone that may have had the desire to do this but wasn’t exactly sure how to go about it.

You can download the application for the tombstone here:

http://www.ancestrallychallenged.com/40-1330.pdf


and you can read about the program here:

http://www.cem.va.gov/CEM/hm_hm.asp

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Hilma
post Feb 24 2008, 01:06 PM
Post #2


Newbie
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Group: Members
From: South Florida
Surnames:
Dickson, Hooper, Seckinger, Folks, Holliday,Hines, Dupree, Finks, Lamberth, Duke, Holland, Harrell, Berry, Benton, Hurt, Alexander, Whitehurst, Cole, Hoskins, Griggs, Whittaker, Eastman, Clark, Overlease, Tune, Smith, Moorman, Dedrick, Torrance, Woodard, Rahn, Miller, Shearouse,Proctor, Hancock, Bates, Keen,& Rickard .




QUOTE(Shanifaye @ Feb 24 2008, 11:17 AM) *
I am sure some of us know about this, but I wanted to make sure everyone did.

QUOTE
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) furnishes upon request, at no charge to the applicant, a government headstone or marker for the grave of any deceased eligible veteran in any cemetery around the world. For all deaths occurring before September 11, 2001, the VA may provide a headstone or marker only for graves that are not marked with a private headstone.
Spouses and dependents buried in a private cemetery are not eligible for a government-provided headstone or marker.
Flat markers in granite, marble, and bronze and upright headstones in granite and marble are available. The style chosen must be consistent with existing monuments at the place of burial. Niche markers are also available to mark columbaria used for inurnment of cremated remains.

Right now I am heading up a project for my husband’s family for one of his ancestors that fought in the War Between the States. At the time of his death in 1923, the family could not afford a traditional tombstone, which meant his is one of many graves marked by nothing but a fieldstone. Unfortunately the church cemetery he was buried at kept no records at all of the burials done in their cemetery, not even a note as to what section a person was laid to rest.
It has been 85 years since his death, and there is no longer anyone living who might remember which rock is his. We have no known place to put flowers or anything to honor him except that his death certificate states he was interred in a specific cemetery.
I am lucky enough that the pastor and the church board agree with me that its important for there to be a marker for this Confederate Veteran and they are currently voting on letting me place a stone in the cemetery, and while it might not be on his actual grave, its at least “something” and will act as a lasting remembrance to a man that endured four years of hell and survived to raise a very long lived and prolific family, one that I am extremely proud to have married into.

Once I have the official “ok” the Pastor and I will pick an appropriate place to have the stone set. I was nervous as to how much setting the stone would cost because, fortunately, I have never had to handle this kind of situation. I called a monument company that is local to the cemetery and was very surprised to find out that they would only charge 125 dollars to set the stone. They even offered to help me fill out the VA application and to take delivery of it, which was something that was worrying me as I didn’t know how I was going to lug around a 230 pound tombstone.

You may ask why am I telling you this story? I do it for one simple reason…how many of us know where a veteran is buried but was not so fortunate as to have a marker? How many of us are lucky enough to have such brave men as ancestors, but there is nothing to mark their service? Growing up in the south I was raised to honor the dead, I still feel guilty when I am in a cemetery and have to actually step on a grave to walk around in it. No matter what war a person served in, no matter what your view on that particular war may have been, I believe that solider deserves to be honored for the sacrifice he gave his country, whether he died in that war, or managed to survive to live out his life. There are so many soldiers that ended up in mass graves, there eventual resting place unknown, that even knowing what section of earth he lays can be a comfort.

I am very lucky that my ancestor is not in a city cemetery and that this church has the discretion of even thinking about letting me do this and I wanted to pass it along to you so that if you could be so lucky as well, you will know that, no matter the war, the government feels that the need for these soldiers to be honored is so strong, they provide you a way to do it for free…they do not even charge you for the delivery fee of the stone.

In my own situation, I am planning a memorial service for William Redding Byers once the stone is up and many of the family members are really excited about it, they are even offering to chip in for the cost of the stone setting. Once we have gone thru the entire process I will report back as to if there were any complications that we encountered, but the lady at the monument company told me she fills these out all the time and has never encountered difficulty as long as all documents the VA wants are submitted with the request.

It is my sincere hope that this information is helpful to someone that may have had the desire to do this but wasn’t exactly sure how to go about it.

You can download the application for the tombstone here:

http://www.ancestrallychallenged.com/40-1330.pdf


and you can read about the program here:

http://www.cem.va.gov/CEM/hm_hm.asp




Back in 1991, I recieved a Bronze VA marker for my father.
But I had to get the headstone for the marker to be attached to.

Hilma Ardito

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margaretann
post Feb 24 2008, 04:12 PM
Post #3


Advanced Member
***

Group: Members
From: Tennessee
Surnames:
James; Tull; Woods, McIntire; McIntyre; Cox, Day; Johnson; Rogers; Morton; Huggins;Cooper; Ruff; Cooksey; Randolph; Poe, Brown; McMillian; Taylor; Myers; Neff; Pennywitt; Will; Sherman; Scherman...; Longernecker; Harpine; Coffman; Kauffman...; Horn; Stiles; Styles; Riddle; Ruddel; Ruddle; Bowman; Hite; Meredith, Walker, Scott, Spence, Hall, Davis, Edge, Pugh, Quick, Dandridge, Giles- all I can think of off the top of my head- will add more later.




QUOTE(Hilma @ Feb 24 2008, 12:06 PM) *
QUOTE(Shanifaye @ Feb 24 2008, 11:17 AM) *
I am sure some of us know about this, but I wanted to make sure everyone did.

QUOTE
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) furnishes upon request, at no charge to the applicant, a government headstone or marker for the grave of any deceased eligible veteran in any cemetery around the world. For all deaths occurring before September 11, 2001, the VA may provide a headstone or marker only for graves that are not marked with a private headstone.
Spouses and dependents buried in a private cemetery are not eligible for a government-provided headstone or marker.
Flat markers in granite, marble, and bronze and upright headstones in granite and marble are available. The style chosen must be consistent with existing monuments at the place of burial. Niche markers are also available to mark columbaria used for inurnment of cremated remains.

Right now I am heading up a project for my husband’s family for one of his ancestors that fought in the War Between the States. At the time of his death in 1923, the family could not afford a traditional tombstone, which meant his is one of many graves marked by nothing but a fieldstone. Unfortunately the church cemetery he was buried at kept no records at all of the burials done in their cemetery, not even a note as to what section a person was laid to rest.
It has been 85 years since his death, and there is no longer anyone living who might remember which rock is his. We have no known place to put flowers or anything to honor him except that his death certificate states he was interred in a specific cemetery.
I am lucky enough that the pastor and the church board agree with me that its important for there to be a marker for this Confederate Veteran and they are currently voting on letting me place a stone in the cemetery, and while it might not be on his actual grave, its at least “something” and will act as a lasting remembrance to a man that endured four years of hell and survived to raise a very long lived and prolific family, one that I am extremely proud to have married into.

Once I have the official “ok” the Pastor and I will pick an appropriate place to have the stone set. I was nervous as to how much setting the stone would cost because, fortunately, I have never had to handle this kind of situation. I called a monument company that is local to the cemetery and was very surprised to find out that they would only charge 125 dollars to set the stone. They even offered to help me fill out the VA application and to take delivery of it, which was something that was worrying me as I didn’t know how I was going to lug around a 230 pound tombstone.

You may ask why am I telling you this story? I do it for one simple reason…how many of us know where a veteran is buried but was not so fortunate as to have a marker? How many of us are lucky enough to have such brave men as ancestors, but there is nothing to mark their service? Growing up in the south I was raised to honor the dead, I still feel guilty when I am in a cemetery and have to actually step on a grave to walk around in it. No matter what war a person served in, no matter what your view on that particular war may have been, I believe that solider deserves to be honored for the sacrifice he gave his country, whether he died in that war, or managed to survive to live out his life. There are so many soldiers that ended up in mass graves, there eventual resting place unknown, that even knowing what section of earth he lays can be a comfort.

I am very lucky that my ancestor is not in a city cemetery and that this church has the discretion of even thinking about letting me do this and I wanted to pass it along to you so that if you could be so lucky as well, you will know that, no matter the war, the government feels that the need for these soldiers to be honored is so strong, they provide you a way to do it for free…they do not even charge you for the delivery fee of the stone.

In my own situation, I am planning a memorial service for William Redding Byers once the stone is up and many of the family members are really excited about it, they are even offering to chip in for the cost of the stone setting. Once we have gone thru the entire process I will report back as to if there were any complications that we encountered, but the lady at the monument company told me she fills these out all the time and has never encountered difficulty as long as all documents the VA wants are submitted with the request.

It is my sincere hope that this information is helpful to someone that may have had the desire to do this but wasn’t exactly sure how to go about it.

You can download the application for the tombstone here:

http://www.ancestrallychallenged.com/40-1330.pdf


and you can read about the program here:

http://www.cem.va.gov/CEM/hm_hm.asp




Back in 1991, I recieved a Bronze VA marker for my father.
But I had to get the headstone for the marker to be attached to.

Hilma Ardito


I may be wrong but I don't think the federal government will provide a Confederate Stone. I think one must go through a Local Chapter of the Sons or Daughters of Confederate Veterans.
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Shanifaye
post Feb 24 2008, 04:16 PM
Post #4


Administrator
***

Group: Root Admin
From: Lilburn, GA
Surnames:
Inman, Bradley, Byers, Derreberry, Owensby and all various spellings thereof




Nope, if you look at the link I provided they certainly do, doesnt matter which side of that war you were on, they provide it

from this page on the VA site http://www.cem.va.gov/cem/hm/hmtype.asp



In addition to the headstone and markers pictured, two special styles of upright headstones are available for Civil War era veterans - one for those who served with the Union Forces and another for those who served with the Confederate Forces. Requests for these special styles should be made in block 27 of the application. It is necessary to submit detailed documentation that supports eligibility.
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