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> Trails and Trials of the Pioneers of the Olympic Peninsula", compiled by Lucile H. Cleland
barrycdog
post Jan 5 2013, 05:39 PM
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From: Hiram, Ga
Surnames:
Colbaugh, Leyden, Forrister, Puckett, Nall




Sudderth James P - Enlisted as private in Company F 6th Georgia State troops Oct 21st 1861. April 16 1862 shows him present Mustered out of Savannah, Ga. April 1862 Enlisted as a private in Company D 9th battalion Ga. Artillery.

James was from Georgia but ended up in Washington

Info from Leah Olson

Humptulips Cemetery, Humptulips, Washington. Here's a couple of pictures. He died 16 March 1907 of pneumonia after suffering with kidney ailment for quite some time. After moving to Texas (he went with a couple of uncles) he got married. He and his wife then took two wagons west with the help of her brother to Muskogee, Oklahoma where they sold the teams and boarded a train for Oakland, California. From there they took a boat to Seattle and then another, smaller boat to Olympia. In Olympia they purchased another team and headed into the Olympic Peninsula. Their first child, born in Texas, made the entire trip and then died. They were the second white family to settle on the Hoquiam River and their son, James, was the first white child born.

She was interviewed for a book about the early pioneers of the Olympic Peninsula. This is her exact quote: "James Sudderth fought through the Civil War with the South in Longstreet's Division, entering when but sixteen years of age. (it was actually 18) He was with Lee when he surrendered his army to Grant. He was with the artillery, and fired the first gun from Lookout Mountain in Tennessee, near Chattanooga. Went through all the big battles. Marching, they passed through twenty-two snows in one winter. Though he never received any wounds during the entire war, his feet were left in bad shape from chillblains. After the war, he came to work on farms in Texas where I met him and married him October 9, 1880."

The book was "Trails and Trials of the Pioneers of the Olympic Peninsula", compiled by Lucile H. Cleland. The book is out of print but I was able to get a copy from ebay. The book is also online.


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barrycdog
post Jan 5 2013, 05:44 PM
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From: Hiram, Ga
Surnames:
Colbaugh, Leyden, Forrister, Puckett, Nall




QUOTE(barrycdog @ Jan 5 2013, 05:39 PM) *
Sudderth James P - Enlisted as private in Company F 6th Georgia State troops Oct 21st 1861. April 16 1862 shows him present Mustered out of Savannah, Ga. April 1862 Enlisted as a private in Company D 9th battalion Ga. Artillery.

James was from Georgia but ended up in Washington

Info from Leah Olson

Humptulips Cemetery, Humptulips, Washington. Here's a couple of pictures. He died 16 March 1907 of pneumonia after suffering with kidney ailment for quite some time. After moving to Texas (he went with a couple of uncles) he got married. He and his wife then took two wagons west with the help of her brother to Muskogee, Oklahoma where they sold the teams and boarded a train for Oakland, California. From there they took a boat to Seattle and then another, smaller boat to Olympia. In Olympia they purchased another team and headed into the Olympic Peninsula. Their first child, born in Texas, made the entire trip and then died. They were the second white family to settle on the Hoquiam River and their son, James, was the first white child born.

She was interviewed for a book about the early pioneers of the Olympic Peninsula. This is her exact quote: "James Sudderth fought through the Civil War with the South in Longstreet's Division, entering when but sixteen years of age. (it was actually 18) He was with Lee when he surrendered his army to Grant. He was with the artillery, and fired the first gun from Lookout Mountain in Tennessee, near Chattanooga. Went through all the big battles. Marching, they passed through twenty-two snows in one winter. Though he never received any wounds during the entire war, his feet were left in bad shape from chillblains. After the war, he came to work on farms in Texas where I met him and married him October 9, 1880."

The book was "Trails and Trials of the Pioneers of the Olympic Peninsula", compiled by Lucile H. Cleland. The book is out of print but I was able to get a copy from ebay. The book is also online.


Here is the book online.

http://www.windsox.us/PIONEERS/BOOK/BB.html
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